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Art Photography

Vintage Cameras Dissected With a Saw and Suspended in Resin by Fabian Oefner

August 25, 2019

Andrew LaSane

For his latest series titled “CutUp,” artist Fabian Oefner (previously) used a band saw to slice film and still cameras into pieces, revealing their beautiful and complex inner workings. The pieces were rearranged, reassembled, and suspended in resin in interesting configurations. Each new sculpture transforms the tools for making art into new works of art designed to be viewed from multiple angles. Explaining the production process, Oefner said in a statement that he uses a “unique mix of high-end and low-end technologies.” Resin is poured around the cameras to prepare the objects for cutting. Oefner’s preferred method for curing the…

 

 



Photography

Uncanny Photographs of Iridescent Oil Spills by Fabian Oefner

August 31, 2016

Christopher Jobson

As part of an ongoing effort to explore the visual effects of iridescence, artist Fabian Oefner (previously) created a new photographic series titled Oil Spill. To create the images he used a syringe to drip small drops of oil into a black reservoir containing water. As the oil expanded into plumes he captured the images you see here reminiscent of giant fires, irises, or exploding stars. You can see more from the series on Behance….

 

 



Art Photography

Colorful Liquid Splashes Captured at 1/3500th of a Second Look Like Floating Sculptures

June 23, 2014

Christopher Jobson

…landscape, a momentary graffiti of air and space. Creating shapes of nature not experienced by the human eye, these short-lived anomalies are frozen for us to view at 3500th of a second. Transforming the non-discernible and ephemeral to the eternal. The essence of photography—immortalize the transitory. You can see several additional shots from the series on their website. If you liked this you can check out similar high-speed liquid works by Manon Wethly, Fabian Oefner, and Shinichi Maruyama. Update: For those curious, the artists share via email that the colors/liquids used in the photographs are “non toxic and water based.”…

 

 



Photography

High Speed Photos of Combusting Alcohol Look like X-Rays of the Human Brain

February 28, 2014

Christopher Jobson

The plume from an exploding bomb. Black and white flowers. X-Rays of a human brain cortex. These all seem like valid guesses when looking at this new series of photos by Fabian Oefner (previously here, here, here), but the truth is more amazing: it’s fire. To create the photos Oefner added a few drops of alcohol into a large glass vessel and waited for the fumes to fill the void. He then ignited the gas and managed to capture these fleeting images as the fire consumed the interior of the vessel. You can see more plus a brief video here….

 

 



Art Photography

Orchid: Exploding High-Speed Paint Flowers by Fabian Oefner

November 5, 2013

Christopher Jobson

For his third and final investigation in his “Paint Action” series Swiss photographer Fabian Oefner (previously here and here) created a series of flower-inspired paint formations titled Orchid. To make the images Oefner poured numerous layers of paint with a top layer of either black or white onto which he dropped a colored sphere. The resulting splash forced the colored paint up and out of the top layer resulting in the crowning splashes of color you see here. While working on the project the Creator’s Project stopped by the photographer’s studio for a discussion about how he works….

 

 



Art Photography

Liquid Jewels: High Speed Photos of Paint on Popped Balloons by Fabian Oefner

August 5, 2013

Christopher Jobson

Liquid Jewel is a new project by Swiss photographer Fabian Oefner (previously) as part of his ongoing exploration of manipulating paint with natural forces such as sound, centrifugal force, and even magnetism. In these new images the photographer turned his attention toward air pressure by harnessing the power of the popped balloon. Oefner covered modeling balloons in thick layers of acrylic paint and photographed each one milliseconds after popping it with a needle. The resulting effect captures the paint as its driven simultaneously inward and outward. See more over on Behance….